Electronic Music vs. Live Instrumentation

History of Robert moog in the electronic music industry and his influence.

Electronic Music vs. Live Instrumentation

Robert Moog, American Pioneer of Electronic Music

Robert Arthur “Bob” Moog (May 23, 1934 ? August 21, 2005), founder of Moog Music, an American company which manufactures electronic musical instruments, was an American pioneer of electronic music, and is best known as the inventor of the Moog synthesizer.
Moog’s innovative electronic design is employed in numerous synthesizers including the Minimoog Model D, Minimoog Voyager, Little Phatty, Moog Taurus Base Pedals, Moog Minitaur, and the Moogerfooger line of effects pedals.
Moog is a native of New York City, and attended the Bronx High School of Science in New York, graduating in 1952. Moog earned a bachelor’s degree in physics from Queen’s College, New York in 1957, another in electrical engineering from Columbia University, and a PhD in engineering physics from Cornell University in 1965. His academic awards include honorary doctorates from Polytechnic Institute of New York University (New York City) and Lycoming College (Williamsport, Pennsylvania).
During his lifetime, Moog established two companies for manufacturing electronic musical instruments: R.A. Moog Co., set up in 1953, and which changed its name to Moog Music in 1972, and which closed down in 1993, and Big Briar, which was setup in 1978. He also worked as a consultant and vice president for new product research at Kurzweil Music Systems from 1984 to 1988, and helped to develop the Kurzweil K2000, which is a 16 bit sampler with a complex synthesis architecture. He spent the early 1990s as a research professor of music at the University of South Carolina at Asheville.
Moog received a Grammy Trustees Award for lifetime achievement in 1970, and in 2002, he was awarded a Special/Merit/Technical Grammy Award, and an honorary doctorate degree from Berklee College of Music.
He gave a lecture which was enthusiastically received, at the 2004 New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME-04), which is an international conference dedicated to scientific research on the development of new technologies for musical expression and artistic performance, held in Hamamatsu, which is known as Japan’s “City of Musical Instruments,” in June 2004. Moog was the inspiration behind the 2004 movie “Moog,” which is a documentary film by Hans Fjellestad about Moog.
Moog was diagnosed with a brain tumor on April 28, 2005, and died at the age of 71 in Asheville, North Carolina on August 21, 2005. He is buried in the Lou Pollack Cemetery in Asheville. The Bob Moog Foundation was created as a memorial, with the aim of continuing his life’s work of developing electronic music.